1787 – Constitutional Convention Convened

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1787 – Constitutional Convention Convened

Constitutional Convention Convened

After the Revolutionary War ended and the United States began learning to live in complete autonomy, the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation became readily apparent. The Confederation government decided to impanel a group of representatives with the directive of revising the Articles to make them more effective. From May to September 1787, the Constitutional Convention met in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Almost from the start, many representatives felt that the Articles were not powerful enough and that the confederate system of government needed to be made over entirely.

At the urging of men such as James Madison and Alexander Hamilton, the Convention set out to create an entirely new form of government in great secrecy. At this convention, many pressing issues were set forth and debated, including taxation, slavery, representation in government, and limiting the scope of government. Along with these, parliamentary procedure was formulated in order to most effectively shape the tentative new government into an efficient body. The structure of the government was decided, as well as the division of power within the government. At the end of the Convention, the delegates were sent home in order to get their respective state legislatures to ratify the new Constitution and allow the new government to take effect.

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